Nordost Playlist – January 2018

Nordost is lucky to have a wonderful team of representatives and product trainers who travel around the world educating and demonstrating the effects of Nordost’s products. As part of these demonstrations, it is our job to find an interesting and diverse selection of music to showcase our cables, power devices, sort system and accessories. Whether at shows, visiting our dealers and distributors or even in our own listening room in our headquarters in Holliston, we are constantly getting asked what music we are playing (or if our audience is not so bold to ask, we can see their Shazams working overtime). So we thought this would be a perfect opportunity to share our favorite songs of the moment. Some may be classics, some may be brand new, some may not even be to your taste, but one thing is for sure …it’s all great music.

Here are some of the songs that we will have on rotation this January.


You can now listen to our monthly playlist here:  TIDAL  |  SPOTIFY


  1. Picture Perfect—Little Simz—Stillness in Wonderland
  2. So I Know You Care—Toulouse—Extended Plea
  3. There Are Many Ways To Say I Love You—Sylvan Esso—There Are Many Ways To Say I Love You
  4. Sweet November—SZA—Z
  5. Skin and Bone (feat. Shirlette Ammons & Tamisha Waden)—Phil Cook, Shirlette Ammons, Tamisha Waden—Skin and Bone
  6. One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)—Frank Sinatra—Frank Sinatra Sings For Only The Lonely
  7. Little Bit—Hablot Brown—Little Bit
  8. A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall—Laura Marling—A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall
  9. No Weaknesses—The Dirty Nil—Higher Power
  10. Si Tu Vois Ma Mere—Orquesta Brazofuerte—Vivo en Thelonious

 

Le Magazine Son & Image reviews the QKORE

Review Banner-QKORE_wide

Nordost’s QKORE has left a big impression on the hifi audio market, since the ground units were first released in May of 2017. Reviews from publications around the world describe the undeniable benefits that the QKORE brings to sound systems. The latest such review comes from Le Magazine Son & Image, where author Michel Leroux explains his experience with the QKORE:

With either the QKORE1 or QKORE3 unit in place, listening becomes engaging. There is better precision and fluidity along with a less veiled sound. A significant improvement of the sound and musical rendering emerges, an unexpected but very real effect. The results are immediate…Clarity improves across the board, very noticeable in instrumental harmonics. Vocal presence is improved, along with overall musicality from the audio system. Dynamic contrast is heightened, and a more natural and coherent rendering of sound and musical content permeates the listening room.

Michel’s review, “Benefits of Parallel Grounding”, is now available to read on the Nordost website(in both English, as well as its original French text).

You can find more great Nordost reviews on our Reviews Page.

Nordost Customer Testimonial

Nordost is always thrilled to receive and share glowing reviews from journalists and experts in the industry. However, when we get testimonials from our devoted and satisfied customers, it means that much more! Thank you to David from England, who started using Nordost cables more than 30 years ago and “never looked back”.


Unknown

I first visited a hi fi show way back in the Eighties, when I was very much younger. I remember hearing some big speakers and was excited by the loudness. Music has always been a part of my soul, and just like my heart beat, music makes the soul happy, and this takes you on emotional journeys. The soul in symbiosis with music evokes feeling and satisfaction. What more could you ask for?

I formed a relationship with Nordost cables and have never looked back.

With my first upgrade from silver ocf wire to buying and installing the Nordost Frey 2 speaker cable, the results were unexpected. My partner who also loves playing hi-end Hifi, was struck by how clear the sound was, with deeper, tighter bass and everything in between being more refined.

Valhalla 2 Power Cords were introduced from wall outlet to the power distribution bar (new additions). The sound from the power cables transferred the signal sounds via the CD player through the pre amp and power amps. Frey 2 speaker cables completed the system, culminating in sounds that seemed like they weren’t emanating from the loudspeakers. The sound had been taken to a new level with the addition of the power cables— more space surrounding each instrument, extracting minuscule details from the Moon 750d CC Player. The thing with the 750d, is that it really digs deep, allowing the cables to lay out a road in front of you, clear of the fog from a frustrating noise floor, with road markings that once were lost, now clear to hear. 

Note: Nordost Sort Kones, sitting under the 750d, resulted in an even lower noise floor and more tuning.  Results will vary depending on which flavour of Sort Kones is used. Four variations exist: Aluminum-Steel, Aluminum-Ceramic, Bronze-Ceramic, and Titanium-Ceramic. When used in different configurations under certain parts of the CD transport, power inlets and transformers, these help to dissipate vibrations emanating from within components.

A project for the future is to get some Nordost Jumpers to help complete the loudspeakers (being tri wired, each loudspeaker).

I’m expected to hear more gain with XLR Cables, in the future when funds allow (may be some time).

If your desire is to feel like you are at a recording studio, listening to a new recording being put down, or back at that live concert, then let Nordost transport you there, once and for all, at lightning speed.

David from England.
Well done Nordost.


What’s your Nordost story?

 

We’re collaborating w/ Newvelle Records!

newvelle banner_3

Nordost is very proud to announce an exciting new partnership with Newvelle Records!

This innovative company has made its mark on music distribution since their first pressing was introduced in 2016. Throughout the year, Newvelle creates a series of six exclusive, vinyl records, each paired with curated artwork and writing, which are released to customers in bi-monthly installments. These six pressings combine to form a box set that takes advantage of its full canvas to express something exceedingly deep and affecting.

The response to their work has been overwhelming, with an onslaught of positive reviews raving about every aspect of Newvelle, from the integrity of their records, to the quality of artists they feature, to the distribution model that they employ.

newvelle season 2-1

We’ve found great symmetry in the ideals, aesthetics, dedication, and craftsmanship between Nordost and Newvelle.  Like us, they care fundamentally, and above all else, about the music. For their next set of recordings at East Side Sound in NYC, Newvelle will be using Nordost cables, including our Pro Audio studio series, Ax Angel, to create their highest quality recordings to date. This partnership will give Nordost customers the unique opportunity to experience their music through Nordost cables from beginning to end.

elan_3

To celebrate this new collaboration, and help you celebrate the upcoming holidays, Newvelle Records is offering the first 100 Nordost customers who purchase their already completed Second Season Box Set an exclusive gift: Piano Noir.

Piano Noir is a record born from the idea of “Making the Connection”— in this case, the connections that can be found between all of the arts involved in the project: audial, visual and literary.  Based on a story that was commissioned by Newvelle from best-selling author Douglas Kennedy, with music written by Newvelle cofounder pianist Elan Mehler, and featuring some of NYC’s best musicians, Piano Noir is a unique piece of art not currently available for sale, and made to Newvelle’s exacting standards.

Take advantage of this exclusive offer by using the promo code “Nordost” at checkout to get your copy of Piano Noir with a purchase of Newvelle’s Season Two, and be a part of this exciting musical movement.

Learn more about Newvelle Records at www.newvelle-records.com

 

Dealer Spotlight: Hanson Audio Video – Cincinnati

By Mike Marko

22256726_10155713651599648_2755663021178106258_o

A world class audio video salon isn’t born every day, especially here in the heartland of Ohio.  On October 12th, 2017 that’s precisely what happened.  Hanson Audio Video officially opened their second state-of-the-art store and showroom in Cincinnati.

This brand new facility showcases high performance solutions to satisfy every aspect of home entertainment.  Hanson’s approach of offering “good” and “better” hifi, allows them to provide both affordable setups that blow away what you can find in the big-box stores, and reference systems which demonstrate what could be possible in a cost-no-object scenario.  You can experience all this and more in Hanson’s modern showcase for music and film, now open in Cincinnati.

22449613_1728936750744099_20998085986726815_n

Hanson’s family owned and run operation first opened its Dayton location in 1999, and soon grew to be one of the premiere audio and video system providers in the nation.  The Dayton location occupies three floors of state-of-the-art systems, and will continue to serve their loyal, satisfied customers in that market as well as in Cincinnati.

IMG_0403

Great stores are run by great people, and Hanson is no exception.  Helmed by Troy Hanson, with help and guidance from his father, Greg Hanson, this multi-generational business excels in customer service.  Hanson employees are comprised of highly skilled professionals with many years of experience and certifications in a wide range of audio, video, automation, computer, and networking applications. They are proficient with custom room/system design and installation services, as well as with the on-going support necessary after the initial install.

IMG_6782

As a Nordost Supreme Reference Dealer and Certified Nordost Specialist, the staff at Hanson Audio Video has been factory trained directly by Nordost. Hanson offers all of Nordost’s available lines to their customers, including cables, from Leif to Odin 2, as well as our entire range of resonance control devices and power products.


10800 Montgomery Road
Cincinnati, OH 45242

Phone:  (513) 563-0444

Email:  sales@hansonav.com

www.hansonav.com


 

Al Griffin reviews Purple Flare for SoundStage!Access

Review Banner-Purple Flare_wide

We love it when cable skeptics review our products. Al Griffin was wary to concentrate on cabling when first tasked by Soundstage! to review our Purple Flare Interconnects and Speaker Cables. However, after taking the time to study the impact that Nordost cables brought to his sound system, he admittedly “crossed a threshold”. The tonal separation between vocals and individual instruments, the increased clarity, and the three-dimensional quality that Purple Flare brought to the performance was undeniable.

“I heard differences almost from the get-go, and those differences were improvements: better resolution of low-level details, and better spatial definition.” 

Al’s Purple Flare review is now available to read on the Nordost website here:  Nordost’s Leif Purple Flare Speaker Cables and Interconnects 

You can find more great Nordost reviews on our Reviews Page.

Picture 392

Nordost Playlist – December 2017

Nordost is lucky to have a wonderful team of representatives and product trainers who travel around the world educating and demonstrating the effects of Nordost’s products. As part of these demonstrations, it is our job to find an interesting and diverse selection of music to showcase our cables, power devices, sort system and accessories. Whether at shows, visiting our dealers and distributors or even in our own listening room in our headquarters in Holliston, we are constantly getting asked what music we are playing (or if our audience is not so bold to ask, we can see their Shazams working overtime). So we thought this would be a perfect opportunity to share our favorite songs of the moment. Some may be classics, some may be brand new, some may not even be to your taste, but one thing is for sure …it’s all great music.

Here are some of the songs that we will have on rotation this December.


You can now listen to our monthly playlist here:  TIDAL  |  SPOTIFY


 

  1. Mind on Fire—Aisha Badru—Mind on Fire
  2. Dancing—Jack DeJohnette—Parallel Realities
  3. Magnolia—Eric Clapton, John Mayer—Eric Clapton & Friends: The Breeze- An Appreciation Of JJ Cale
  4. Love Interruption—Jack White—Jack White Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016
  5. That Woman Will Give It A Try—Mable John—Stay Out Of The Kitchen (Remastered)
  6. Wedding Dress—Sam Amidon—All Is Well
  7. Qi—Phildel—Qi
  8. Dance In The The Old Fashioned Way—Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire—Together
  9. French Press—Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever—The French Press
  10. It’s All Good—Superorganism—It’s All Good

 

 

Analog vs Digital — The Great Audio Debate   

One of the most hotly contested debates in modern-day hifi is one of source and substance: analog or digital. The preferential rift isn’t as clear-cut as one would think. Thanks to the recent resurgence of vinyl (and even reel–to-reel, which is increasingly seen at hifi shows), one’s inclination towards LPs or CDs, tapes or WAV files, can’t be determined by the decade one was born in.  There are benefits and deficiencies to both formats to be sure, and that is exactly what we are exploring here…

 

jack-hamilton-135654

Argument for Analog

Aside from the obvious nostalgia, there are several reasons why discerning music lovers would opt for analog over digital sources. To many, vinyl recordings have a more authentic, natural quality than their digital counterparts (which critics often describe as cold and uninviting). Some may argue that analog bandwidth is superior, especially when compared to the dumbed-down results of compressed recordings (although those recordings are getting better with time, thanks to modernized digital files). Bandwidth aside, the REAL allure of analog is its raw charm, which has the power to elicit an emotional response from listeners. The term that is typically associated with this emotional response is “analog warmth”. It is interesting to note that this distinctive warmth is in fact a side-effect of technical imperfections in the analog recording process. Whether it is speed-stability issues of magnetic recording tape, or harmonic distortions created by transformers, each of these flaws leads to an enhancement of the mood, character, and enjoyment that comes with analog reproduction. And that enjoyment is only amplified when you add the ceremonial aspects to LP listening. No skipping around tracks—just you, the music, and the liner notes and artwork provided on your canvas-like cover.

 

pile-of-cds-compact-discs-and-dvds-picjumbo-com

Digital Defense

Where analog may sweep with the nostalgia and feel-good factors, digital sources win out in terms of precision and convenience. We have advocated for “analog warmth”. However, let’s not forget that a lot of that warmth is the direct result of distortion—and some of that distortion is not so welcome. In general, digital recordings have a greater SNR (signal to noise ratio), and in many cases, that leads to a more enjoyable listening experience. Of course there are some wonderful pressings of vinyl available, but those LPs come with a high price tag. Unfortunately, the majority of affordable records are noisy, warped and distorted. Furthermore, while the ritual of getting out an album and listening to it play out in full may stand the test of time, the album (or tape) itself does not. The grooves and tapes of analog recordings can only withstand so much play time—digital files, on the other hand, can be listened to ad infinitum without any negative repercussions to their sonic integrity. Even at “first play”, you may be better off going with digital, since even standard CDs have significant dynamic advantages over vinyl. Lastly, consider the convenience of digital storage and the variety of digital streaming. Thanks to new technology and ever-improving files, audiophiles can keep their entire music catalog at their fingertips and explore artists and genres that they never would have been exposed to otherwise, with the click of a button.

 

The debate of analog vs digital could go on and on without a concrete, impartial conclusion. For the most part, the correct answer is highly individualized and preferential. It is a testament to our industry that we have so many great options on which to experience high fidelity recordings. But a debate is a debate, so we ask you: How do you like to have your music delivered to you?

Questions and Answers (November 2017)

Our product specialists receive questions on a daily basis about Nordost products, their application, and hifi in general.  We thought that we would take a minute to share some of our most recent and frequently asked questions here so that everyone can get the answers they are looking for!


Screen Shot 2017-11-10 at 2.14.38 PMQ: I am in the process of upgrading my audio cables, but the way that my system is set up, I need to make sure that whatever I get is flexible. Can your speaker wire be bent to form around corners?

A: Yes, because Nordost cables are made with extruded FEP, they can be bent and folded without delaminating or damaging the insulation. Our Lief cables have virtually zero restrictions in flexibility. However, due to the solid core, high gauge conductors used in some of our Reference ranges, they do become a little less flexible, but can still be bent to at least a 90° angle.


Screen Shot 2017-11-10 at 2.13.56 PM

Q: Can I use Sort Füt under turntables? Are you aware of others doing this with turntables and/or do you advise against it for any reason?

A: You can use the Sort Füt with any component that allows for threaded inserts. We have had a lot of positive feedback from people who have installed our Sort Füt under their turntables. Not only does it help in terms of draining unwanted vibrations, but it is a great way to level your turntable as well. In fact, we use the Sort Füt under our VPI Classic Turntable in our own sound room.


Screen Shot 2017-11-10 at 12.28.14 PM

Q: I have Nordost speaker cables, and I see that there are arrows on them. What do the arrows signify? Do they make an impact on how I install them into my system?

A: The arrows that you see on your speaker cables indicate the direction of signal flow once it is set up in the system.  Since the signal goes from the amp to the speaker, you want to make sure that the arrow is pointing to the speaker.


Q: I just ordered 2 pcs of your QV2 AC line harmonizers. Can I leave these devices plugged into the wall AC outlet all the time, or do I need to unplug them when my audio system is not in use? Will leaving them hooked up to a wall outlet decrease their lifespan? 

A: Unless you experience power surges or things of that nature, you can leave them plugged in at all times.  Having them on all the time won’t hurt the lifespan, unless they are subject to surges or electrical spikes.

Nelson Brill On New Audiophile Quality Recordings From Troubadours Spinning Tales From Americana

Real music lovers can find the melody in everything. From the park to the concert hall, our friend Nelson Brill is always on the hunt for great sound. In this blog, Brill focuses his attention on three wonderful folk acts — Charlie Parr, John McEuen, and Sherman Holmes.  


 

NEW AUDIOPHILE QUALITY RECORDINGS FROM TROUBADOURS SPINNING TALES FROM AMERICANA

By Nelson Brill

NOVEMBER 3, 2017

images-4

First up, a recent movie tip: the 2016 biopic, Maudie [Screen Door Productions/Sony Pictures Classics] is a stellar film that portrays the life of Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis [1903-1970] who overcame many obstacles, including being orphaned at a young age; suffering a lifetime of disease and abuse from her husband and society at large, to blossom as an artist. In this moving film, the actress Sally Hawkins plays Lewis and captures all of her fragility, sense of humor and resilience with passion and quiet dignity. Ethan Hawke is also superb as Lewis’ abusive and reclusive spouse.

AMAUDIE-768x512

sfexaminer.com

 

Lewis’ paintings capture her love of the landscape of her native Nova Scotia, (dancing flowers, bleak wintry scenes, birds in flight, workers in the fields), and is a testament to the power of folk art grounded in a particular place and time.

covered-bridge-3-1-768x654

oenogallery

 

Folk art, in the musical context, can also work a mesmerizing hold on the human need to tell stories of a certain place and time, accompanied by an irresistible back beat. One such master of this musical form is Minnesota native Charlie Parr, (www.charlieparr.com) who performed an intimate solo concert within the warm pine-paneled walls of the Atwoods Tavern in Cambridge, MA. (www.atwoodstavern.com) on October 2nd. Parr’s inventive yarns glowed with the glory and heartbreak of people living within his landscape of rural Minnesota and beyond, sung in a voice that rose in spiky, maverick expression.

charlieparr-768x432

modmobilian.com

Parr’s show at the Atwood, (resembling a house concert with the capacity young crowd swaying to Parr’s fleet guitar and thunderous foot-stomping) was ignited by Parr singing a number of originals from his 2015 audiophile gem, Stumpjumper [Red House Records; www.redhouserecords.com).

61NCSI3B51L._SS500-300x300

Highlights included a lilting “Remember Me If I Forget” (with swirling slide guitar accents quick and agile) and the contemplative “Over The Red Cedar”, a revolving beauty that tells the tale of a neighborhood kid growing into a man and realizing the passage of time. Parr also took a raucous detour into “Falcon”, (another highlight from Stumpjumper), that rocked furiously on a spinning tale of a wisecracking “north of the Red River” character surviving as best he can. On “Falcon,” Parr’s pumping acoustic guitar and heavy foot stomps sounded like baseball cards flipping in bicycle spokes: revolving in crisp colors with great vocal bravado, string heat and fleet guitar propulsion.

a2008346590_10-768x432

bandcamp.com

Parr also plunged with scrappy heat into several numbers taken from his new recording, Dog [Red House Records] where his lyrics shone like little powerful firecrackers, bursting with life. He sang meditatively about a tale of sons following in the footsteps of their fathers (“Hobo”); about our comic rituals surrounding death (“I Ain’t Dead Yet”) (with Parr’s slide working its greased magic) and finishing with a blistering version of the classic murder tale, “Stagger Lee,” belting his vocals and tumultuous guitar strums to the height of expressive power. Parr also paid tribute to his friend and fellow traveler, the incomparable Spider John Koerner, playing a version of one of Koerner’s comic tales (that features Buffalo Bill and Koerner’s contemplation of Free Will) in an effervescent tumble of Parr’s sharp guitar lines and playful majesty. Parr left the stage to the raucous ovations of the audience who hung on every one of his craggy lyrics and the crackling sound of his spinning, incisive guitar licks.

61DIV6vzGQL._SY300_QL70_

Returning from Parr’s intimate and soulful performance, I was reminded of a new recording by another superb folk art master who also takes his inspiration from the likes of Spider John Koerner, Jerry Jeff Walker, Johnny Cash and Warren Zevon to create his own stew of rollicking folk music joy. Roots Music Made in Brooklyn [Chesky Records; www.chesky.com] is a new recording by singer, songwriter and string master John McEuen. For this recording, McEuen assembled a sterling group of musicians at the Hirsch Center in Brooklyn, New York for an informal jam session that delivers a bountiful feast of acoustic gifts. The audio quality of this Chesky “binaural recording” (utilizing their “3D and Applied Acoustics” recording technics) is superb in its tactile and dynamic presence; its natural tones and colors and, (as always with the Chesky label), a beautiful capturing of instruments and voices illuminating the natural space and air of the particular recording venue.  [For another vivid dose of the Chesky label’s new sonic gifts, listen to the amazing 2016 Chesky recording Stripped that ensnares the craggy vocals of Macy Gray (with her stellar band) in a performance that shimmers and soars in airy delights].

71APLX2uepL._SY355_

On McEuen’s disc, instrumental compositions “Acoustic Traveler”, “Brooklyn Crossing” and “Miner’s Night Out” are all shining, carefree explorations of Americana melodies with garlands of beautiful solos from this swanking ensemble.

john2002ibbotsongrandjunctionco-768x578

e-town

These include sweet clarinet solos from Andy Goessling; sparkling fiddle from Jay Ungar; deft guitar solos from David Bromberg and McEuen and pumping acoustic bass from Skip Ward. McEuen’s canvas encompasses the swanking gospel of “I Rose Up” (with layered background vocalists rising and falling around banjo pricks and fiddle sways), to the rough and tumble sounds of  New Orleans in “Travelin Mood,” (with David Bromberg firing up his acoustic guitar flowing into David Amram’s soaring penny whistle solo).

maxresdefault-768x432

youtube.com

The crisp interplay between these spirited musicians also propels McEuen’s free-flowing versions of Warren Zevon’s comic, sardonic treats: “Excitable Boy” (with Bromberg’s vocals taking a turn next to swaying mandolin, fiddle and chorus) and “My Dirty Life And Times,” taken at a bluesy pace (led by Steve Martin’s scrappy banjo) with mandolin, dobro and fiddle accents swirling around McEuen’s vocals. Delectable blue-grass is also here on “Blue Ridge Cabin Home” and “The Mountain Whippoorwill,” where McEuen’s solo fiddle and spoken words pay tribute to another folk hero, Vasser Clements. McEuen’s words and instrumental radiance reverberate off the walls of the recording space in spare elegance on this twisting tale.

john-mceuen_hi-res_1-768x567

newfrontiertouring.com

The crowning glory to this recording is McEuen and his band’s version of Jerry Jeff Walker’s folk classic, “Mr. Bojangles.” This swaying beauty brews on the expressive vocals of David Bromberg, John Cowan and others, reveling in this expressive tale all curled up with acoustic accompaniments plied and strummed with quiet passion.

holmes5

npr.org

A final, glorious dip into new musical folk art recordings takes us to Christchurch, Virginia into the deep blues, gospel and tumultuous rock flowing in the blood of Sherman Holmes, bassist and vocalist for the venerable Holmes Brothers Band. Since the death of his two brothers, Holmes has soldiered on to now produce a glowing new recording with his Sherman Holmes Project, The Richmond Sessions [M.C. Records; www.mc-records.com] in which his voice, bass and keyboard presides in a gathering of musicians and gospel singers who make these folk, gospel and rock tunes shimmer and shake.

71WsViWs3YL._SY355_

The recording quality is superb. This is no surprise because Mark Carpentieri’s M.C. Records is well known for producing recordings with great presence, dynamic energy and natural, life-like image dimensionality. (Take a listen to M.C. Records’ 1999 recording of Odetta, in her Blues Everywhere I Go for a reference blues recording of knockout beauty and passion).

81WsxSSvNL._SX355_

A crackling presence of pumping guitars, propulsive bass and vivid vocals sears this new M.C. Records recording of the Sherman Holmes Project from start to finish. Holmes and his swanking band glow in their gospel righteousness on such gut-thumping traditionals as “Wide River”, “I Want Jesus” and “Rock of Ages.” All of these tunes are laced with the deep spirited vocals of Homes and the surging power of his background vocal group, “The Ingramettes,” three female vocalists who bring supremely assured vocal prowess and soaring power to the mix.

maxresdefault-1-768x432

youtube.com

The band extends their gospel and soul roots into exuberant, rocking versions of Ben Harper’s “Homeless Child”, John Fogerty’s “Green River”; Holland, Dozier’s “Don’t Do It” (made famous by The Band’s rollicking version) and a roguish “Breaking Up Somebody’s Home”.  In each of these volcanic gems, the musicianship is superb, with sparkling solos from Rob Ickes’ spindly and inventive dobro and David Van Deventer’s crafty fiddle.  Jim Lauderdale’s “Lonesome Pines” brings us home, with its slow cyclical expressive vocals, spinning banjo and ebullient hits from Ickes’ dobro. Here is power and soul; instrumental glitter and intoxicating singing that all take the Sherman Holmes Project’s folk portrait to a foot-stomping earthy place within the rich and diverse soil of Americana.

dsc_0307

npr.org


If you would like to read more reviews like this one, visit Nelson’s blog at www.bostonconcertreviews.com.